Page 1 sur 4 123 ... DernièreDernière
Affichage des résultats 1 à 10 sur 34

Discussion: Heated sidewalks?

  1. #1
    Date d'inscription
    mars 2010
    Localisation
    Laval
    Messages
    3 699

    Par défaut Heated sidewalks?

    Sweden’s heated sidewalks should be adopted here, too

    Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/healt...#ixzz1G1a00iwT

    I spent last Saturday night in an unusual way.

    Instead of going to a film, I barbecued hot dogs and marshmallows over outdoor fires, with a thousand other people at Place Jacques Cartier Square in Old Montreal.

    Then I joined another big crowd wandering the river in the Old Port. Finally at midnight I dropped in at the Contemporary Art Museum where another huge mob was hanging around in the cold, yakking.

    It was "Nuit blanche," our once-a-winter chance to have a hot time in the cold town at night. Montreal was a big party just like summer, except we were all wearing parkas instead of t-shirts and boots instead of sandals.

    I found myself asking the obvious question - why isn't our city like this all winter? Montrealers clearly want to do things outdoors in winter when they're given the chance - so why not every Saturday night, and Friday too? Why not have an "Hiver blanche" instead of a "Nuit blanche"?

    For much of winter we cloister inside at night at home, or in bars, movies and malls, leaving the streets nearly deserted - but does winter have to be this way?

    I recently visited Scandinavia, my last stop for a film I'm making on how other winter nations compare to us. I've already described how Russians embrace winter by holding outdoor dances and barbecues, and going ice swimming and eating ice cream.

    But visiting Norway and Sweden was another eye-opener. For starters I saw something miraculous I'd never even imagined - heated sidewalks that cover large parts of downtown in several cities. The streets are covered with snow like ours but the sidewalks are 100-per-cent snow-free - block after block of bare concrete without a snowflake to be seen.

    The result is amazing. The downtowns were crowded with people you rarely see out in Montreal winter - the elderly with their canes, the handicapped on walkers and in wheelchairs, and mothers pushing baby carriages.

    Swedes and Norwegians of all ages were ecstatic about their snow-free sidewalks. "They're fabulous," said one middle-aged woman in Oslo. "I go for lots of winter walks because I don't have to worry about falling, or jumping over puddles of slush.

    "Look - I'm even wearing high heels."

    Scandinavians haven't spent a fortune on this, either. Every time they tear up a sidewalk for repair, they put in heated coils that melt ice and snow -- and gradually over 15 years their downtown sidewalks have been winter-proofed.

    Norwegians heat theirs with electricity after studies found it costs less than shovelling them. They also save a fortune in health costs, because people don't slip on ice and wind up in hospital.

    If anyone deserves heated sidewalks, it's us Montrealers. We have more snow than any major city on earth and a government-owned Hydro business to provide cheap heat. But I'm not expecting Montreal to get them any time this century.

    Our blue-collar workers would go on strike to defend the right to snowy sidewalks they can shovel at double overtime.

    Another idea I loved in Norway was that most downtown cafés keep their outdoor terraces open all winter. They just cover them with plastic awnings that have heaters built in. All the outdoor chairs are covered cozily in thick furs and blankets.

    I sat out one night having a drink at minus-22 and there were lots of people around for company.

    The idea started as a way to let smokers stay outside in winter without freezing, but non-smokers quickly joined them and the trend spread. As one bartender told me: "If it grows any more we may have to kick the smokers out of the terraces and back inside."

    Again, why don't we do this? We have a few heat lamps on Crescent St. and elsewhere for smokers but I've never seen one terrace open in winter. "Nuit blanche" is a good start at getting people outside - but we need more excuses to brave the cold.

    In Montreal, call something a festival and everyone shows up, so why not invent more winter festivals? How about a "Hot Jazzfest" in January, or an outdoor February Film Festival where we could watch "Some Like It Hot" or "Gidget Goes Hawaiian," or something cooler like "Dr. Zhivago"?

    Our summer fireworks festival is a huge success - maybe we should extend it into winter too, or make it a Fire Works Festival, where we all huddle by massive bonfires. I suspect any excuse will bring Montrealers out into the winter night. How about a hot tub festival, or a hot toddy festival, or a wifi hot spot festival?

    After travelling to other winter countries I've had enough of our famed underground city - it's time we came above ground for winter too. We are Montrealers - not moles.

    Josh_freed@hotmail.com



    Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/healt...#ixzz1G1ZknAKg
    http://www.montrealgazette.com/healt...020/story.html

  2. #2
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2010
    Localisation
    Montreal
    Messages
    4 582

    Par défaut

    I often dream that one day they will find a way to harness all that excess heat from the Métro system by venting some of it strategically outside.
    Can you imagine Saint-Catherine, de Maisonneuve, Sherbrooke and the sidestreets free of snow & ice all winter...

  3. #3
    Date d'inscription
    février 2007
    Localisation
    La Prairie
    Messages
    10 641

    Par défaut

    Our blue-collar workers would go on strike to defend the right to snowy sidewalks they can shovel at double overtime.
    Unfortunately, this sentence pretty much sums up our chances of ever seeing something as incredible as heated sidewalks in our city! Unions are evil!!!
    Daddy Likes It Dirty!
    Veni, vidi, vici!
    Faith is belief in the absence of evidence.
    GO HABS GO

  4. #4
    Date d'inscription
    février 2007
    Localisation
    Montreal
    Messages
    5 086

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par Habsfan Voir le message
    Unfortunately, this sentence pretty much sums up our chances of ever seeing something as incredible as heated sidewalks in our city! Unions are evil!!!
    That and the city / government are penny pinchers. They keep fixing potholes will tar every year, instead of finding a real solution.

  5. #5
    Date d'inscription
    août 2009
    Localisation
    montreal
    Messages
    1 702

    Par défaut

    blue collars could just keep plowing the concrete, they it now all the time anyway ...
    disclaimer: excusez la lecture de mes mots, j'ai plusieurs langues secondes.

  6. #6
    Date d'inscription
    février 2008
    Localisation
    Montreal
    Messages
    755

    Par défaut

    With our useless mayor don't hold your breath waiting for this to happen

  7. #7
    Date d'inscription
    septembre 2009
    Localisation
    Montréal
    Messages
    808

    Par défaut

    We have it: Plaza Saint-Hubert!

    Je ne crois pas cependant que ce soit un plus.

  8. #8
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2007
    Localisation
    Banlieue nord est de Montréal
    Messages
    4 393
    Blog Entries
    881

    Par défaut

    "Our blue-collar workers would go on strike to defend the right to snowy sidewalks they can shovel at double overtime."


    Citation Envoyé par Habsfan Voir le message
    Unfortunately, this sentence pretty much sums up our chances of ever seeing something as incredible as heated sidewalks in our city! Unions are evil!!!
    Désolé, mais en tout respect, cette affirmation est totalement gratuite et de mauvaise foi. Les syndicats n'ont jamais été contre le progrès et on trouvera autant de "dinosaures" du côté des gens d'affaires. Généraliser est commettre une injustice grave vis à vis des personnes sincères qui se sont dévouées pour améliorer le sort de plein d'employés autant dans le domaine public que privé.

    Bien sûr on connait la mauvaise réputation des matamores syndicaux des cols bleus de la ville de Montréal. Ils ont détruit eux-mêmes leur image par des conflits ruineux, violents mais certainement non représentatifs de l'action syndicale normale.

    Avant d'affirmer pareilles inepties, peut-être vaudrait-il mieux interroger les syndicats eux-mêmes? Toute personne sensée optera pour le mieux-être de la population. Et c'est le premier mandat des syndicats, même s'ils n'y parviennent pas toujours. Idem pour les gouvernements et l'entreprise privée qui ont eux aussi plein de ratés, faut-il pour autant les traiter de démoniaques?

    Pour ce qui est des trottoirs chauffants, idée géniale venant des pays scandinaves, pourtant paradis syndical s'il en est un, devrait nous inspirer afin de mieux maitriser l'accumulation de neige et les coûts exorbitants qui en découlent. Le simple fait de le mentionner est déjà un pas dans la bonne direction et il serait sûrement intéressant de pousser l'enquête plus loin.

    Il y a peut-être de nombreuses économies à faire tout autant dans les budgets déneigement que de sécurité publique? Ce qui parait être un rêve pour les montréalais semble être une réalité pour certains européens du nord. Il faudra voir la faisabilité d'un tel projet, en commençant en priorité par les rues du centre-ville et aussi les pistes cyclables?

    J'y vois personnellement beaucoup d'avantages en plus de la sécurité piétonnière: économie de carburant, amélioration du bilan écologique, moins de pollution générale, des rues dégagées plus facilement, une main-d'oeuvre moins nombreuse et dédiée à d'autres tâches, moins d'équipements de déneigement donc aussi moins d'entretien mécanique, un grand ménage du printemps moins exhaustif, etc, etc.

    Faut voir aussi la technologie utilisée et les coûts pour s'assurer de la rentabilité de l'opération. J'aimerais bien, en conclusion, voir une étude détaillée sur le sujet parce qu'en dépit du réchauffement planétaire, rien ne garanti que nos hivers, en ville du moins, seront moins pénibles qu'aujourd'hui.

    Un beau sujet pour nos émissions d'enquêtes publiques qui pourraient nous donner l'heure juste et nous indiquer des pistes de solutions.

  9. #9
    Date d'inscription
    février 2007
    Localisation
    La Prairie
    Messages
    10 641

    Par défaut

    Désolé, mais en tout respect, cette affirmation est totalement gratuite et de mauvaise foi. Les syndicats n'ont jamais été contre le progrès et on trouvera autant de "dinosaures" du côté des gens d'affaires. Généraliser est commettre une injustice grave vis à vis des personnes sincères qui se sont dévouées pour améliorer le sort de plein d'employés autant dans le domaine public que privé.

    Bien sûr on connait la mauvaise réputation des matamores syndicaux des cols bleus de la ville de Montréal. Ils ont détruit eux-mêmes leur image par des conflits ruineux, violents mais certainement non représentatifs de l'action syndicale normale.
    C'est ton opinion et j'ai droit à la mienne. J'ai été syndiqué pendant 9 ans. J'ai vu de mes propres yeux ce que la "sécurité" d'être syndiqué fait aux employés. Ça les rends moins productifs, plus paresseux, j'ai même vu des employés "seniors" avertir les p'tits nouveaux de ne pas trop en faire!! Il faut le faire! J'ai été dégouté par cette expérience. J'ai même demandé de ne pas être syndiqué quand j'ai appliqué sur mon poste, et on m'a dit que je n'avais pas le droit..donc on me FORCAIT à me syndiquer, même si je ne voulais pas. JE crache sur les syndicats d'aujourd'hui. J'aimerais leur vomir dessus! Ils me dégoutent. Dans les syndicats on ne récompense pas les bons employés, on récompense les employés qui ont le plus d'acienneté. C'est écoeurant!

    Oui, il n'y a pas de doutes, les syndicats étaient nécessaires dans les années 40, 50 et 60, car il y avait de l'abus de la part des proprios, mais c'est une toute autre affaire aujourd'hui!
    Daddy Likes It Dirty!
    Veni, vidi, vici!
    Faith is belief in the absence of evidence.
    GO HABS GO

  10. #10
    Date d'inscription
    mars 2010
    Localisation
    Laval
    Messages
    3 699

    Par défaut

    À mon avis, la réponse est plus simple que ça: les syndiqués ne souhaitent pas nécessairement pelleter la neige, ils souhaitent empêcher des sous-contractants de le faire à leur place. S'il n'y a plus de neige à pelleter, le problème ne se pose plus. Ils vont faire autre chose.......

Règles de messages

  • Vous ne pouvez pas créer de nouvelles discussions
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des réponses
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des pièces jointes
  • Vous ne pouvez pas modifier vos messages
  •